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Understanding the Elements of Fiction

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Understanding the Elements of Fiction

Understanding the Elements of Fiction

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.

Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences, conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.

Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

Analyze the influence of the words and phrases in a text including figurative and connotative meanings and how they shape meaning and tone.

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences, conclusions, and/or generalizations drawn from the text.

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story, drama, or poem propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Determine how the author uses the meaning of words or phrases, including figurative and connotative meanings, in a text; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., verbal irony, puns) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., bullheaded, willful, firm, persistent, resolute).

Comprehension requires and enhances critical thinking and is constructed through the intentional interaction between reader and text

Effective use of vocabulary builds social and academic knowledge

Information to gain or expand knowledge can be acquired through a variety of sources.

Language is used to communicate and to deepen understanding.

Spoken language can be represented in print.

Acquiring and applying a robust vocabulary assists in constructing meaning

Essential content of text, including literary elements and devices, inform meaning

Essential content, literary elements and devices inform meaning

In the English language words can be understood by analyzing both the phonetic and the morphological parts.

Informational sources have unique purposes.

Textual features and organization inform meaning

Analyze organizational features of text (e.g. sequence, question/answer, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, problem/solution) as related to content to clarify and enhance meaning

Apply academic vocabulary across disciplines

Develop an increasingly sophisticated working vocabulary including specialized vocabulary from academic content areas.

Differentiate between primary and secondary source material.

Evaluate the presentation of essential and non-essential information in texts.

Identify conflict, theme and/or point of view within and among texts

Identify and analyze relationships between characters, topics, events, sequence of events, setting, and/or plot within and among texts (i.e. literary elements)

Identify and evaluate essential content between and among various text types

Identify characteristics of primary and secondary source materials.

Indentify and explain the literal and figurative meaning of vocabulary

Question, reflect on, and interpret essential content across texts

Question, reflect on, and interpret essential content across texts and subject areas

Summarize relevant information from source material to achieve a research goal.

Synthesize relevant information from source materials to achieve a research goal.

Use and cite evidence from texts to make assertions, inferences, generalizations, and to draw conclusions

Use connections between and among words based on meaning, content, and context to distinguish nuances or connotations

Use grade appropriate resources to confirm and extend meaning of vocabulary

Use the knowledge of language, including word origins and morphology to unlock meaning of specialized vocabulary across disciplines

Verify the relevance and reliability of information presented in texts

Students will review and refine the elements of fiction within and across texts. This unit will provide concrete practice to advance students ability to analyze literary elements and figurative language. Students will:

identify characteristics of fiction.

identify and analyze the effect of literary elements.

explain how literary elements are used to develop and support theme.

How do learners develop and refine their vocabulary?

How do readers know what to believe in what they read, hear and view?

How do readers know what to believe in what they read, hear, and view?

How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?

How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?

What strategies and resources do I use to figure out unknown vocabulary?

What strategies and resources does the learner use to figure out unknown vocabulary?

How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?

How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?

What strategies and resources does the learner use to figure out unknown vocabulary?

How do learners develop and refine their vocabulary?

How do readers know what to believe in what they read, hear, and view?

Analyzing Figurative Language and Imagery in Poetry

The possible inclusion of commercial websites below is not an implied endorsement of their products, which are not free, and are not required for this lesson plan.

Definethemein fiction. Name at least three types of evidence you can use to identify a theme.

Theme is a topic of discussion or writing; a major idea broad enough to cover the entire scope of a literary work. Types of evidence include dialogue, actions, and mood shifts of characters; figurative language; setting.

Student response provides an accurate definition forthemeand provides at least three types of evidence that can be used in developing theme.

Student response provides an accurate definition forthemeand provides at least two types of evidence that can be used in developing theme.

Student response provides either an accurate definition forthemeOR one type of evidence that can be used in developing theme.

Student demonstrates a lack of understanding of the task or makes no attempt to complete the task.

Have each student read a narrative poem and complete one of the tasks below. Suggested poems include Paul Reveres Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Casey at the Bat by Ernest Thayer, Barbara Frietchie by John Greenleaf Whittier, or Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost. Other appropriate poems may be substituted.

Design a poster that identifies elements of fiction for the poem you chose (plot, theme, point of view, setting, characters, and figurative language or imagery). Include the poems title and authors name.

Complete a graphic organizer that identifies each element of fiction for the poem you chose (plot, theme, point of view, setting, characters, and figurative language or imagery). Students can use the graphic organizer in the Performance Assessment worksheet (L-8-2_Performance Assessment.doc).

Create a graphic organizer to indicate how the elements of fiction in the poem you chose (plot, theme, point of view, setting, characters, and figurative language or imagery) contribute to the theme.

Performance Assessment Scoring Rubric:

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies all six of the required elements (plot, theme, point of view, setting, characters, and figurative language or imagery).

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies five of the required elements.

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies four of the required elements.

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies three of the required elements.

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies two of the required elements.

Student completes one of the tasks and accurately identifies one of the required elements.

Student demonstrates a lack of understanding of the task or makes no attempt to complete one of the tasks.

Note: The Performance Assessment and rubric may be modified to require only three of the six categories.

Categories: General fiction

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